FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS     

DEFINITIONS

- Coordinated Community Response (CCR):
A systemic, multi-layered approach to domestic violence that employs collaborative and integrated service delivery.

- Fellow
:
A law enforcement officer, advocate, or prosecutor participating in ICCR.

- Cohort
:
The full group of Fellows participating in ICCR during each 12-month period. Each Cohort will be comprised of six Teams.

- Rural
:
Counties designated as “rural” by the Office of Management & Budget OR counties that have a population of less than 50,000 people.

- Team
:
County-based, multi-disciplinary team made up of a law enforcement officer, advocate, and prosecutor.


2. HOW MUCH DOES IT COST TO PARTICIPATE?

Nothing at all! There are NO fees associated with the Institute. Training, travel, lodging, and all other expenses are covered by the generous support of the W.W. Caruth, Jr. Foundation & the Moody Foundation.

3. WHO IS ELIGIBLE TO PARTICIPATE?

Teams of three—made up of a prosecutor, law enforcement officer, and advocate—from rural counties in Texas are encouraged to apply. 

- ADVOCATE: Community-based advocate (ie. from a domestic violence services agency). In addition, some communities may also choose to include a system advocate (ie. Victim Assistance Coordinator)
- LAW ENFORCEMENT: May be from the Sheriff's Office or any Police Department within your county
- PROSECUTOR: Prosecutor from County or District Attorney’s Office

We ask that all Fellows plan, in good faith, to be at their current agency for at least two more years. Fellows are also required to secure the support of the head of their agency/organization/department.

For the purposes of ICCR, rural means any county that has been designated as "rural" by the Office of Management & Budget OR has a population of less than 50,000 people. 
 
Click here for more eligibility details and to access the application. 
 

4. WHAT IF WE DON'T HAVE AN ADVOCACY AGENCY IN OUR TOWN?

Many rural counties are served by domestic violence agencies that are not within their own county limits. If you are not sure which agency serves your county, click here.

Even if your county’s domestic violence agency is not within your county limits, they are still eligible to participate in your CCR. If you need assistance connecting with an advocate, please reach out to Brooke Meyer, bmeyer@conferencecaw.org. We are happy to help make connections!

5. WHAT ARE THE RESPONSIBILITIES OF ICCR FELLOWS?

Fellows are expected to actively participate in ICCR activities for a full year. The curriculum is flexible to accommodate a variety of schedules and workloads.

At a minimum, fellows should ensure they have the time and capacity to commit to the following:

-  Attend the Conference on Crimes Against Women in Dallas, Texas at the beginning and end of your Cohort year (registration, travel, and lodging costs are covered by ICCR).

-  Actively work with team members to create your Coordinated Community Response, including completing your Best Practice Assessment and Collaborative Action Plan.

-  Complete 80% of assignments. Fellows can expect to spend an average of one hour per week on ICCR tasks.

-  Complete bi-yearly surveys and interviews during and upon completion of ICCR for evaluation purposes.

6. WHAT IS A COORDINATED COMMUNITY RESPONSE?

A community’s systemic response to domestic violence is a "complex machine." Without all of the machine's parts (domestic violence agencies, law enforcement, prosecutors, medical personnel, child abuse response, etc.) working together, the machine isn’t able to function as intended.

Coordinated Community Responses (CCRs) help our systemic “machines” function effectively to address intimate partner violence. CCRs are endorsed by both the Office on Violence Against Women and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The CCR concept and its first iteration, the “Duluth Model”, was created by Ellen Pence in 1980. Since that time, many more CCR models and tools have been developed and evaluated for effectiveness. Examples of proven CCR models include, but are not limited to:

  • Community Assessment Teams
  • Domestic Violence High Risk Teams
  • Domestic Violence Taskforces
  • Fatality Review Teams
  • Lethality Assessment Programs

7. HOW DOES THE BEST PRACTICE ASSESSMENT WORK?

The Best Practice Assessment (BPA) is a structured review of several real domestic violence cases in your community that examines the impact of current policies and procedures on victims of domestic violence. The BPA serves as the backbone of the ICCR curriculum and sets this program apart from other, less extensive training programs. The BPA encourages each team to build on your county’s own unique strengths, rather than employing a “one size fits all” approach, to ensure that the resulting CCR is the best approach for each individual community.

BPA Steps:

-     Assign a coordinator and select team members

-  Decide BPA focus (emergency communications; patrol response; investigations; prosecution charging decisions; victim-witness services; bail evaluation and conditions of release; and/or pre-trial release supervision and enforcement)

-       Map current system response to domestic violence

-       Review case records and policies

-       Conduct survivor focus groups

-       Develop findings and recommend changes

Click here to learn more about how the BPA fits into the overall ICCR curriculum.

8. WHEN DOES THE NEXT TRAINING YEAR BEGIN?

The 2021 training cohort will begin on May 23, 2021, in Dallas, Texas at the 16th Annual Conference on Crimes Against Women.

9. HOW DO WE APPLY?

Applications for the 2021 training cohort are now open and are due by November 30, 2020.

Because we are targeting specific geographic clusters in Texas, we encourage you to apply EARLY! Note that your team’s application will not be considered complete until all team members have been identified and have submitted their portion of the application.

Click here to learn more about eligibility and apply for the 2021 cohort.

10. WHEN WILL WE KNOW IF WE'VE BEEN ACCEPTED?

Decisions will be made in December 2020 for the 2021 cohort.

Please contact Brooke Meyer, bmeyer@conferencecaw.org, if you have any additional questions.



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