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Rural Communities

By Rachel Bauldree

This PCADV fact sheet details the barriers facing rural victims of domestic violence. National resources are also provided, with recent research to supplement the information. Although based in Pennsylvania, this domestic violence coalition provides accurate and detailed information for victims from across the United States.

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Police response to violence against women

By Rachel Bauldree

The International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) provides a resource library for police response to violence against women, which includes tools, policies, and resources to assist law enforcement in responding effectively to human trafficking, sexual assault, domestic and sexual violence by police officers, stalking, strangulation, domestic violence, and other crimes of intimate partner violence (2019).

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How DV/SA Advocates Can Work with Landlords for Survivors’ Housing Stability

By Rachel Bauldree

This webinar from the National Alliance for Safe Housing will explore proactive ways to partner with landlords in your community and how to ensure survivors are partners throughout the process. We will examine why cultivating relationships between landlords and survivors can be challenging and provide strategies to help domestic and sexual violence develop these partnerships successfully (2019).

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Episode 8: Rape culture in the time of #MeToo

By Rachel Bauldree

Amy Jones is a Licensed Professional Counselor Supervisor and the CEO of the Dallas Area Rape Crisis Center- an organization that provides counseling, crisis intervention and advocacy for those whose lives have been affected by sexual violence. Our conversation today focuses on Rape Culture, a concept that first surfaced in the 1970s, notably in the publication of the work “Rape: The First Sourcebook for Women,” put forth by the New York Radical Feminists Collective in 1974, and then further explored in depth in the 1975 documentary Rape Culture. The term Rape Culture remains popular still, and recent films like Duma (doo-muh) have explored the impact of rape culture around the world. Today, Rape Culture is broadly defined as sexual violence being treated as the norm, wherein victims are blamed for their own sexual assaults. Over the past several decades the discussion of rape culture has endured and become more organized and may have finally found a collective, universal voice within the #MeToo movement which is becoming an effective catalyst for changing how we as a society think about rape and women’s rights (2020).

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