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Episode 12: Why labels matter: The dangers of casual diagnoses in abusive relationships

By Rachel Bauldree

We talk today with Julie Owens, a victim advocate who survived the domestic violence of attempted murder. For three decades she has consulted and trained nationally and internationally for organizations, governments, and professionals. She created a domestic violence crisis team for ERs and a transitional shelter before directing DV trauma therapy research at the National Center for PTSD. Julie consults and trains independently for organizations including the Office for Victims of Crime, the National Human Trafficking Center, and Bank of America. Her focus is survivor-centered, trauma informed victim advocacy in secular and faith-based settings. Content warnings for this episode include abuse, physical and sexual violence (2020).

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Episode 10: Why doesn’t she leave? An officer’s perspective on domestic violence

By Rachel Bauldree

Our guest today is Mark Wynn, 21-year member of the Metropolitan Nashville Police Department who served as Lieutenant to the Domestic Violence Division and as a member of the Special Weapons and Tactics (SWAT) Team for fifteen years. A trainer, advocate and specialist in the field of domestic violence for law enforcement, Mark Wynn is the recipient of no less that 121 commendations and 51 awards for his work, including the 1995 National Improvement of Justice Award and the 1998 Nashvillian of the Year Award. Content warnings for this episode include: physical violence and abuse (2020).

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Episode 1: The art of perception: Seeing what matters most

By Rachel Bauldree

The first episode of the Podcast on Crimes Against Women features originally scheduled 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker Amy Herman, author, attorney, and art historian, whose ground-breaking work in the study of visual perception through art became a method of investigation for law enforcement and launched a movement she describes as The Art of Perception. The recent publication of her book “Visual Intelligence: Sharpen Your Perception, Change Your Life” enables people to see what matters in order to better investigate crimes and criminal behavior resulting in better outcomes from investigation. In this episode, Herman reveals how examining works of art can sharpen observation, analysis, and communication skills by revealing our implicit biases. Content warnings for this episode include: violence, abuse (2020).

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